Creating the World of ‘Olodumare City’

With the release date of GameCargo’s two upcoming animated shorts ‘The Bear Destination’ and ‘The Manifestation of Boogie’ upon us, I felt that it was important to reflect on why they were originally produced and how they came to be separate but connected installments from the ‘Drive-In Universe’.

Quite a few years back, both were intended to be a part of a trilogy of music videos for a shelved Hip-Hop and Rap album from ‘Ultimate Mecha’. Not too many people know this, but the subsidiary record label was created before GameCargo. After that particular musical venture was left alone, relatively costly remnants of the project still remained. The most notable were cartoons that featured the artist, his real-life brother who worked on the cover art for the album, and a teddy bear that was meant to pay homage to the “Baby Steps” quest from ‘Fallout 3’. like the lyrics on the album were consistent with references to video games and old cartoons such as ‘Tom and Jerry’, which is mentioned on a track conveniently titled ‘At The Drive-In’.

Since entertainment and media were GameCargo’s primary focus, ‘Ultimate Mecha’ became a subsidiary company that produced music for its parent organization. From podcasts, film, and now animations. So, the founder decided to repurpose the two animations that were once shelved and incorporate them into a multiverse of sorts. The layer would showcase what fictional characters in stories may enjoy from time to time. Fortunately, the two animations shared enough similarities with each other that they could be connected with a concept that was currently being brainstormed. Ironically, this concept would draw from other ideas that the founder had and worked in unison with one another after being sewn together.

One of the main characters in this world, Mikhael Singleton, is loosely based on a draft for a mockumentary. A black stuntman who wants to be an action hero. The most drastic change made would be giving him a fake British accent that he would utilize to garner roles meant for Black American actors, but often given to Black British actors. Satire on subject matter that remains controversial to debate, still.

https://www.vulture.com/2017/04/black-american-and-british-actors-what-the-debate-gets-wrong.html

The character Luke Townsend would still be based off-his real-life artist brother and would act as a freelance storyboard artist that assists with scenes Mikhael Singleton would roughly write. They are, however, step-brothers with the same father and different mother.

Aryana Reynolds is loosely based on a protagonist that Gold Will, a frequent guest of the podcast ‘Black Grindhouse’ and Linwood Storm, the host, imagined tackling in a collaborative film that never went into production. The original character was still a retired porn star that wanted a successful career. The main difference is that the original character was a lot younger than her milf adaptation, wasn’t South African, and she wanted to be a comic book creator. Aryana Reynolds desires fame and wealth as a mainstream actress. She is intrigued by Mikhael and Luke’s desire to make an action film on their own terms and wants to participate in it while she searches for her “big break”. All three of them share a very small apartment in a frantic area of Olodumare City.

While a third animated short to close a trilogy of pilots is underway, a mini-series with a twelve-minute per episode schedule is currently being outlined for an undisclosed production date. The show will contain several nods and homages that will make even the most die-hard cinephiles do a double-take.